European Gypsy Moth (EGM)

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Oak tree with three European Gypsy Moths egg masses attached to the trunk of the tree. Egg masses are light tan colour with a fuzzy covering; one egg mass has eggs visible

About this project

The European Gypsy Moth (EGM) is a non-native, invasive forest pest. EGM prefers the leaves of deciduous hardwood trees like maple, elm and oak. It will also feed on apple, alder, birch, poplar and willow trees. The City is using different management techniques to address EGM.



What you can do now

There are actions that we all can do to help stop the spread of this non native, invasive pest. The cold winter months are the time when you can be pro-active with reducing EGM, by removing egg masses on your trees. This video shows you exactly how to go about the removal.



What the City is planning

A recent report to the Municipal Council’s Planning and Environment Committee provided an update on the 2021 European Gypsy Moth proposed management plan.



Street tree egg mass removals

Scraping egg masses can be an effective tool in managing EGM, especially combined with other techniques. Each egg mass that is removed can have between 100 and 1,000 eggs.

Last year, street tree egg mass scraping had a positive impact on reducing defoliation.

This year, 37 streets are forecasted to be severely defoliated in the following areas:

Click the links above to see the maps of the specific streets and trees.

City crews and contractors are manually removing egg masses by scraping them from the ground and for larger trees using an aerial bucket truck. Arborist climbers will also be used if needed in challenging locations that are not accessible by a vehicle. Egg masses will be removed from all sides of the tree, branches and limbs up to approximately 50’.


About this project

The European Gypsy Moth (EGM) is a non-native, invasive forest pest. EGM prefers the leaves of deciduous hardwood trees like maple, elm and oak. It will also feed on apple, alder, birch, poplar and willow trees. The City is using different management techniques to address EGM.



What you can do now

There are actions that we all can do to help stop the spread of this non native, invasive pest. The cold winter months are the time when you can be pro-active with reducing EGM, by removing egg masses on your trees. This video shows you exactly how to go about the removal.



What the City is planning

A recent report to the Municipal Council’s Planning and Environment Committee provided an update on the 2021 European Gypsy Moth proposed management plan.



Street tree egg mass removals

Scraping egg masses can be an effective tool in managing EGM, especially combined with other techniques. Each egg mass that is removed can have between 100 and 1,000 eggs.

Last year, street tree egg mass scraping had a positive impact on reducing defoliation.

This year, 37 streets are forecasted to be severely defoliated in the following areas:

Click the links above to see the maps of the specific streets and trees.

City crews and contractors are manually removing egg masses by scraping them from the ground and for larger trees using an aerial bucket truck. Arborist climbers will also be used if needed in challenging locations that are not accessible by a vehicle. Egg masses will be removed from all sides of the tree, branches and limbs up to approximately 50’.


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