Climate Emergency Action Plan

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The Thames River downtown.


The City of London is continuing to develop our community’s Climate Emergency Action Plan. As a result of COVID-19, the plan was disrupted, but the City is now creating more time and opportunities for Londoners to provide input.

The Climate Emergency Action Plan is an urgent response to our changing climate. The goals are to reduce London’s greenhouse gas emissions by at least 30% by 2030 and reach net-zero by 2050.

A recent report to the Municipal Council’s Strategic Priorities and Policy Committee provided an update of the development of the Climate Emergency Action Plan, actions that have been under way, the revised schedule, initial ideas for engaging the community and London's businesses, and plans to carry on the work.

Developing the Climate Emergency Action Plan will be an ongoing process. Additional information and opportunities to provide input will continue to be posted later this fall and winter. You can subscribe for email updates on this page where more information will be shared.

Please provide feedback below in a number of ways.

  1. Quickly leave a comment or share an idea online.
  2. Complete a Feedback Form – A list of high level actions to potentially be included in the Climate Emergency Action Plan are presented here, separated into categories related to how we live, move, grow, green and prosper.
  3. Review the Discussion Primer of potential actions – This document details potential high level actions and their supporting actions that could be included in the Climate Emergency Action Plan. Participants can fill out the Discussion Primer online, or complete and submit it as a PDF.
  4. Build a plan for London - Create and share your own Climate Action Plan for London using eDemocracy Network's Climate Action Plan Simulator.
  5. Connect with the project team directly by contacting climateaction@london.ca

An illustration of the different engagement opportunities for the Climate Emergency Action Plan.


The City of London is continuing to develop our community’s Climate Emergency Action Plan. As a result of COVID-19, the plan was disrupted, but the City is now creating more time and opportunities for Londoners to provide input.

The Climate Emergency Action Plan is an urgent response to our changing climate. The goals are to reduce London’s greenhouse gas emissions by at least 30% by 2030 and reach net-zero by 2050.

A recent report to the Municipal Council’s Strategic Priorities and Policy Committee provided an update of the development of the Climate Emergency Action Plan, actions that have been under way, the revised schedule, initial ideas for engaging the community and London's businesses, and plans to carry on the work.

Developing the Climate Emergency Action Plan will be an ongoing process. Additional information and opportunities to provide input will continue to be posted later this fall and winter. You can subscribe for email updates on this page where more information will be shared.

Please provide feedback below in a number of ways.

  1. Quickly leave a comment or share an idea online.
  2. Complete a Feedback Form – A list of high level actions to potentially be included in the Climate Emergency Action Plan are presented here, separated into categories related to how we live, move, grow, green and prosper.
  3. Review the Discussion Primer of potential actions – This document details potential high level actions and their supporting actions that could be included in the Climate Emergency Action Plan. Participants can fill out the Discussion Primer online, or complete and submit it as a PDF.
  4. Build a plan for London - Create and share your own Climate Action Plan for London using eDemocracy Network's Climate Action Plan Simulator.
  5. Connect with the project team directly by contacting climateaction@london.ca

An illustration of the different engagement opportunities for the Climate Emergency Action Plan.

What have you or your organization done to adapt to climate change?

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Hi There - As you might know, I teach ENVR 9012 at the Centre for Environment and Sustainability at UWO. In the Fall of 2020, the graduate class produced an applied Air Source Heat Pump feasibility group project and research study for the City of London through the City Studio partnership. This graduate study project received the Judge's Choice Award from City Studio. The project was shared with City Staff upon completion. Additional graduate research projects were completed individually by students on a wide range of topics including: flood mitigation & adaptation, preservation of urban green spaces (specific to Meadowlily Woods ESA), smart growth and densification, urban agriculture, urban forestry, waste reduction, municipal financing for solar PV and rooftop solar, low-carbon and alternative transportation, carbon sequestration strategies, urban cycling, circular economy, biodiversity conservation, green roofs, sustainable urbanism and wild-land conservation in urban areas. These research reports and comparative case studies are available to support staff with CEAP developments upon further request. I am available for consultation and research services and support on CEAP developments upon further request. Thank you otherwise for your ongoing and important efforts to address the climate crises in London, Ontario Canada in an inclusive, equitable and broadly appealing manner.

Brennan Vogel, PhD 13 days ago

initiating a hydroponic vertical farm within city infrastructure will ensure an ease of produce production. illuminating or minimizing transportation of product, thus creating a system of self awareness and self sustainability. Everything from herbs to fruits and fish can be grown or raised within a hydroponic facility. lowering global foot prints and increasing sustainability is defeating climate changes on multiple levels

parkerj 14 days ago

I think the city could benefit from policies to ensure all future houses and buildings are built to the highest level of sustainability. I also think the city could provide incentives so that individuals could purchase electric vehicles. Incentives for houses that already stand could also help individuals make the switch to electric heating.

Nadine 14 days ago

We must apply a climate tax to the people of london.they have been saving money through covof and they want to help the climate.. the city can plant s fee trees with the money and give the bureaucrats a huge raise.

Pete downing 17 days ago

I endorse Lorraine's proposal to build a major waste-to-energy anaerobic digestion facility to address the issue of the disposition of organic waste in our region. Not only would this result in a significant reduction in GHG due to rotting, but would contribute to the production of green energy. We should be looking at repurposing rather than removal.

ellie 20 days ago

10 kw solar system on an outbuilding which cost $50,000. BTW I just completed the FEEDBACK Survey, but although it asked frequently if I could help, it never once asked for my contact info.

Bruce Lamb 28 days ago

I recycle, compost, re-use everything that can be re-used and practice sustainable gardening including the use of a push lawnmower.Gardening is one of the most polluting industries in North America, in the US almost a third of the water pumped is used in gardening, lawnmowers use 100 times more fuel than a car for the same mechanical work and mineral fertilizers, pesticides and a number of other chemicals contaminate soils and underground waters that end-up in rivers and lakes. This is aggravated by the lack of public knowledge on the doses of chemicals that can be added to the soil.Still, there are sustainable ways of gardening that include, for example, the use of compost, mulch and organic fertilizers.According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a new gas-powered lawnmower produces as many volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides emissions in one hour of operation as 11 new cars each being driven for one hour.Since this equipment is used mostly during the hot summer months, when ground-level ozone is the highest, it causes problems for asthmatics and aggravates other respiratory conditions. When weather forecasts indicate ground-level ozone (the main component of smog) could reach an unhealthy level, environmental agencies will call an Ozone Action Day. Standard ozone alert day advice is to delay or curtail all gas mowing.Gas lawnmowers also generate enough noise to scare away the fauna in one hectare around yourself—not to mention to anger your neighbours and damage your eardrums.Using a push mower instead of a gas-powered mower helps to reduce CO2 by over 80 lbs. a year according to the EPA.I suggest that the city or the province apply a carbon or emissions tax to sellers and owners of gas-powered lawnmowers and regulate them the same way motor vehicles are regulated for emissions and noise. The mowers, and for that matter any other equipment, must have top-allowable limits of chemical and noise pollution.

Jorge about 1 month ago

acknowledge its factual existence and encourage that others do so or they shall be publicly shamed.

soop@soop.ca about 1 month ago

We really need to include agriculture and meat consumption as part of our plan. Assessment of all aspects of industry and society is important.Considerations:* Agriculture & meat consumption reduction: https://www.agr.gc.ca/eng/agriculture-and-the-environment/agricultural-practices/climate-change-and-agriculture/greenhouse-gases-and-agriculture/?id=1329321969842* Meat is the most inefficient way of eating (in terms of water & land use) and results in unnecessary waste.* Each type of meat has its own break down of "worse / better" (red meats, poultry, fish, etc) http://nationalenvironmentalpro.com/what-meat-to-eat/* This does not mean everyone has to give up meat, but as a society we can greatly reduce a portion of emissions and waste by reducing our consumption. For those that would like to give it up entirely shall be lauded.* Ultimately it would be great to incentivize non-meat diets and societal change.

MattC about 1 month ago

Adapt compost collection, more community gardens, proper conservation and maintenance of conservation areas, school conservation field trips.

Tunya about 1 month ago

1) Ban single-use plastic2) Green Bins, this would both reduce GHG and create jobs3) Community Garden (This could double as a way to get some extra food for the homeless)

Tim G about 1 month ago

As large solar farms are decommissioned to make way for newer technologies it may be wise to contact the owners and see if they’d be willing to donate the old solar panels for use. Often these solar panels still have >80% life and generating capacity left.

Kevin Smith about 1 month ago

It is critical that we introduce organic waste collection on an urgent basis in single family households as well as residential buildings. London should be embarrassed to be the only major Ontario city without green bins. Methane from rotting organic waste in landfill is the second most damaging GHG and more potent than CO2. Why aren't we building a major waste-to-energy anaerobic digestion facility to serve south-western Ontario, provide green jobs, divert food and organic waste from landfill, and reduce our carbon footprint dramatically. Come on, London. It's nearly 2021. Let's start the New Year right!

Lorraine about 1 month ago

With the biggest source of emissions being personal vehicle use, that needs to be the biggest area of focus. That means 1) building upwards, not outwards, 2) investing in public transit, 3) investing in protected cycling infrastructure, and 4) saying no to unnecessary road widening projects that encourage more cars.

K about 2 months ago

We already know how to reduce GHG dramatically. You have to reduce the amount of driving people do. That means much greater investments in public transportation and active transportation infrastructure. But the city has had opportunities to do that for decades and hasn't acted on it. And they won't.

Graham about 2 months ago

Give incentives for home owners to turn their lawns into pollinator gardens, veggie/ fruit gardens, or naturalized wildlife areas.

Heather about 2 months ago

I 100% agree with Pat's comment. There are highly qualified research professionals who can draft and implement a city-wide plan to reduce GHGs. Debating or sharing ideas amongst lay people is not helpful and, at times, is simply harmful. How many advancements have been sidelined because lay people voice their dissent about change? How many city streets have been widened because people want more lanes while failing to recognize study after study confirms induced demand makes congestion worse? How many protected bike lanes have been denied because it might affect parking or be perceived as inconveniencing drivers? My advice: hire professionals and make mitigating climate change a real priority rather than declaring a climate emergency while widening roads and introducing new needless ones for millions of dollars in order to save drivers 1min. Twenty years ago, we could claim that we had to balance competing needs. During those decades, we nearly always tipped the scale away from climate change mitigation. We no longer have the luxury to balance climate change against competing demands. The City of London should hire professional researchers and give them the ability to implement real change.

Amanda about 2 months ago

GMOs and pesticides should not be used on farms in London. I say this as an Orthodox Jew who sees these items as harmful to G-d's creation. Native biodiversity is harmed by these pesticides, herbicides and other genetic modifications. This also affects Jewish eating habits, as only organic foods can be verified kosher. GMO products cannot be labeled kosher according to Rabbi Moshe ben Nachman, who said "mankind should not disturb the fundamental nature of creation". I hope the city takes this into consideration in making the city and agriculture more kosher friendly.

Benjamin Lewek about 2 months ago

This may be simplistic but I think our priority actions should be whatever will help stop climate change the most efficiently. The debating by laypeople of which issues are best to do is very problematic. We do not have the knowledge to highlight which issue is most effectoive to stop climate change.

Pat 2 months ago

I'm really concerned about the environmental impact associated with tearing down buildings to erect new ones, and also with the renovation industry. I think this needs to be discouraged where possible and not allowed where possible. Not just for homeowners, but especially for developers - why are we considering tearing down perfectly good older buildings to build towers, instead of renovating. An example is 550 Wellington. The environmental cost of tearing down and rebuilding (concrete having a huge carbon footprint) doesn't seem to be a consideration.

lneumann 2 months ago