Neighbourhood Decision Making

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Thank you to everyone who submitted an idea through Neighbourhood Decision Making. Over the coming weeks, City staff will be vetting each idea for feasibility. Ideas that are feasible will be added to the Vote Day ballot. Stay tuned for more information related to the idea ballot and Vote Day.

Real projects to help make your neighbourhood event better!

Residents know the needs of their neighbourhoods better than anyone. They're the ones with great ideas to help make their neighbourhood stronger, safer, connected and vibrant. Many neighbourhood can benefit from things like community events, a new park bench or a pollinator garden. But some ideas need a bit of cash to come to life.

That’s why the City of London created our Neighbourhood Decision Making Program, where residents submit their ideas and get to vote on which ideas they want to see come to life. That’s what makes this program special -- the community gets to decide!

Neighbourhood Decision Making allows residents to be involved in making their neighbourhood a better place to live, while connecting with their neighbours and engaging in their municipal government.

The Guidelines for Ideas can be found below.

About Neighbourhood Decision Making

Starting in 2017, Council has committed $250,000 annually to support a Neighbourhood Decision Making program across the city. The purpose of this program is to engage, empower, and connect residents by bringing neighbours together around community-driven projects that enhance and strengthen their neighbourhoods.

The Neighbourhood Decision Making program supports residents to propose ideas for how to spend a portion of the municipal budget in their neighbourhoods. Resident ideas are vetted for feasibility by Civic Administration, and once approved, developed into proposals to be represented on the ballot. A community vote is held to determine which proposals will receive funding. Civic Administration then work with residents to implement the proposals in their neighbourhoods.

To ensure an even spread of the available $250,000, the city is divided into five geographic areas, each area receiving $50,000 for projects, and each project capped at $30,000.

Thank you to everyone who submitted an idea through Neighbourhood Decision Making. Over the coming weeks, City staff will be vetting each idea for feasibility. Ideas that are feasible will be added to the Vote Day ballot. Stay tuned for more information related to the idea ballot and Vote Day.

Real projects to help make your neighbourhood event better!

Residents know the needs of their neighbourhoods better than anyone. They're the ones with great ideas to help make their neighbourhood stronger, safer, connected and vibrant. Many neighbourhood can benefit from things like community events, a new park bench or a pollinator garden. But some ideas need a bit of cash to come to life.

That’s why the City of London created our Neighbourhood Decision Making Program, where residents submit their ideas and get to vote on which ideas they want to see come to life. That’s what makes this program special -- the community gets to decide!

Neighbourhood Decision Making allows residents to be involved in making their neighbourhood a better place to live, while connecting with their neighbours and engaging in their municipal government.

The Guidelines for Ideas can be found below.

About Neighbourhood Decision Making

Starting in 2017, Council has committed $250,000 annually to support a Neighbourhood Decision Making program across the city. The purpose of this program is to engage, empower, and connect residents by bringing neighbours together around community-driven projects that enhance and strengthen their neighbourhoods.

The Neighbourhood Decision Making program supports residents to propose ideas for how to spend a portion of the municipal budget in their neighbourhoods. Resident ideas are vetted for feasibility by Civic Administration, and once approved, developed into proposals to be represented on the ballot. A community vote is held to determine which proposals will receive funding. Civic Administration then work with residents to implement the proposals in their neighbourhoods.

To ensure an even spread of the available $250,000, the city is divided into five geographic areas, each area receiving $50,000 for projects, and each project capped at $30,000.

Ask a Question

Have a question related to Neighbourhood Decision Making? Share your questions below and City staff member will follow up with more information.

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    What are the borders for the 5 geographical areas and what criteria was used to determine the areas? Thank you

    Nassim asked about 1 month ago

    Hi Nassim,

    Thanks so much for reaching out! Below is a map of all the areas of the City.  

    Population sizes and natural boundaries like main arterial roads and where our Neighbourhood Associations were located were considered when establishing the areas.

    Don’t hesitate to reach out to neighbourgood@london.ca if you have anymore questions. 

    Have a great day,  

    The NeighbourGood Team

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    Hi! I am wondering what the five geographic areas are in the city and what the streets and guidelines are

    Erin asked about 1 month ago

    Hi Erin,

    Thanks so much for reaching out! Below is a map of all the areas of the City. Don’t hesitate to reach out to neighbourgood@london.ca if you have anymore questions. 


    Have a great day, 

    The NeighbourGood Team

Page last updated: 24 September 2021, 14:12