About BRT

In the next 20 years, London is expected to grow by 84,000 people. BRT is part of a city-wide plan to give every resident choices for convenient, safe, accessible transportation.

BRT is a rapid transit system that aims to ease congestion across the city and use buses to move thousands of people in dedicated bus lanes on London’s busiest routes. Separated from general traffic, BRT buses will run every five or 10 minutes without adding to congestion, working with local buses for an overall 35% increase in transit service. Other City road projects – some already under way – will work with BRT to change the way traffic flows across London.

Learn more about BRT at www.londonbrt.ca

On June 7, 2018, the City of London entered into the formal Transit Project Assessment Process (TPAP), as set out by the Province through Ontario Regulation 231/08. TPAP focuses on assessing potential impacts of a selected transit project, in this case, the approximately 24 km Bus Rapid Transit network comprising north, east, south, and west corridors, and a one-way downtown couplet.

On Oct. 1 the BRT team announced its decision to pause the formal Transit Project Assessment Process (TPAP) to take time to strengthen our heritage strategy.

Through discussions with Ontario’s Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport, we have developed a detailed plan for providing more comprehensive information on potential heritage impacts. We anticipate the earliest date for providing this information will be the end of March, 2019.

This pause is not expected to impact the overall 10-year project budget or timeline.

We look forward to keeping you updated on our progress toward re-starting the Transit Project Assessment Process.

Once TPAP has been restarted, an Environmental Project Report (EPR) will be filed, documenting any potential environmental effects and mitigation requirements of the project. Documents related to the Project, including technical studies and consultation materials, are available on the project website. The public, regulatory agencies, Indigenous communities, and other interested persons will have an opportunity to review the EPR during a formal 30-day review period. Objections may be submitted to the Minister of the Environment and Climate Change during this period.

All information produced as part of this project is available on the project website at www.londonbrt.ca

Read the Cultural Heritage Screening Report in the Draft Environmental Project Report to
learn more about the work that has been done to date relating to heritage.

View the list of properties that will undergo additional
review during the Transit Project Assessment Process.

View the timeline for completing cultural
heritage work during the Transit Project Assessment Process.

If you have questions or comments, contact us anytime at ldnbrt@london.ca

An Environmental Assessment (EA) is the process of determining what environmental impacts, if any, there will be during a project and how to minimize the impacts. The Environmental Assessment process falls under the Ontario Environmental Assessment Act.

The term "environment" includes the natural, social, cultural, built and economic environments.

Interactive Map

Interactive BRT Network Map

Check out any location on the Bus Rapid Transit network, drop a pin, and leave a comment. By clicking on different elements of the BRT network map, you can view specific infrastructure descriptions. Select a green pin to view renderings for select areas of the network. If the map is slow to load, clear your browser cache.

What's Ahead

On Oct. 1 the BRT team announced its decision to pause the formal Transit Project Assessment Process (TPAP) to take time to strengthen our heritage strategy.

Through discussions with Ontario’s Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport, we have developed a detailed plan for providing more comprehensive information on potential heritage impacts. We presented this plan to the London Advisory Committee on Heritage (LACH) on Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018.

It’s critical to provide information that is thorough and complete. We anticipate the earliest date for providing this information will be the end of March, 2019.

We don’t anticipate significant heritage impacts – but it is important to do a thorough and comprehensive review. It is important to do this right.

In terms of the ten-year project budget and timeline, we don’t expect this pause to have any material impact overall. This heritage work was always embedded in our plans, at a later date.

Heritage is important in London, and we share the Ministry’s commitment to a clear and effective cultural heritage strategy.

We look forward to keeping you updated on our progress toward re-starting the Transit Project Assessment Process.